working at some dead-end job; get your hands on your dream internship so you will get the experience and addition to your resume you have always wanted!' /> _____________________________________

Summer is around the corner and it means one thing for college students: Internship time!

When you’re in college, sometimes it’s difficult to get an internship. But there are some general resources you have to tap before calling quits!

Need help with your cover letter or resume? Check out EssayEdge.com; they’ll help you get the internship or job you want with expert writing and editing advice.

A. FRIENDS and PEERS

Ask around! See if any friends (especially older ones) have done internships with professors in previous semesters and are willing to offer emails and insight.

This information is priceless since it saves you time and you can find valuable info on what this particular internship opportunity is like.

B. ASK YOUR PROFESSORS

First off: Get to know your professors. This is not only beneficial for the sake of asking for a letter or recommendation, but also for asking them for an internship.

Make sure not to put direct pressure on your professor by asking them for one. Instead ask them the following: “I’m really hoping for an internship this summer, if you know of any could you let me know? I’d be more than happy to send you my resume if that helps.”

Wording your request in that fashion that allows your professor to offer you one if they have openings and lets them know how dedicated you are.

Internship

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C. EMAIL FACULTY

Every university has a department website which lists faculty names. Email a cover letter and resume to each faculty member requesting an internship.

While it’s okay to copy and paste some general items—such as class, major, and experience—make sure that you specify why you’re interested in working for THEM.

This method worked fabulously for me. In fact, one summer I had 3 psychology internships because I got so many responses!

I had the luxury of saying yes and no to whomever I wanted and chose my internships based on time commitment and my interest level.

D. MEET YOUR ADVISOR

Every major or college should have a dean or advisor who can meet with students by scheduling appointments.

Make an appointment and ask them how to approach an internship. These people have been with universities for years and know the inside tricks on how to score an internship.

While nothing is a hundred percent, if you try these four routes, you will almost always guarantee an internship.

But don’t be shocked if you can’t get a summer internship in June—these spots are small in numbers and coveted by hundreds! Make sure you send out internship emails NOW!

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